Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SPONSOR
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 69
LANGUAGE
English 69
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 6:30pm PST
of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporter: already there is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitions for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that we'll address bigger issues in the new year. >> he proposed tonight a smaller package, a smaller deal. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for the deficit if this small deal, mini deal is passed? >> well, that could be a big problem because basically he's left out
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 6:30pm PST
gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> reporter: the president declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell called the white house meeting a good one and he told his fellow republicans he hoped to have a fiscal cliff recommendation soon. >> we will be working hard to see if we can get there in next 24 hours and so i am hopeful and optimistic. >> reporter: but the sticking point remains finding something that can make it through the house with enough support from republicans. >> it seems like the 250 threshold that the president proposed previously is unlikely to pass the house in its current form, and so without some sort of additional compromise there, it seems unlikely that we're going to get something done before the end of the year. >> susie: you know than
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 6:30pm PST
1, though it is unlikely to stay there for long. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: the fiscal cliff was certainly one topic on the agenda of the federal reserve today as policymakers kicked off their two-day meeting. tomorrow, the world will be waiting to see whether the central bank will do more to prop up the u.s. economy. the big question is whether the fed will stick with its so- called "operation twist" bond- buying program, or will it announce something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply extend its operation twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 6:30pm PST
night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry reid predicted the economy would go over the cliff. speaking from the senate floor he said there's not enough time between now and the end of the year to reach a deal. but stocks erased their losses in the final hour of trading on news that the house of representatives will reconvene on sunday night to resume talks. by the closing bell, the dow was down only 18 points, bouncing back from a triple digit loss, the nasdaq lost four, and the s&p slipped almost two points. so what happens next? and can lawmakers prevent an economic crisis by a
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm PST
. >> you've no doubt been following the maneuvers in washington over the country's finances. well, they're heading now toward a showdown. unless someone blinks, the collision of irresistible forces with immovable objects will be felt around the world. president obama says he won't budge when it comes to ending the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. and as rumors mount that some republicans may be willing to give ground on taxes, conservatives in the party are shouting, "remember the alamo!" and demanding their leaders in congress yield not an inch. dozens of conservative activists, outraged at the prospect of compromise, have sent an open letter to republicans in the house and senate "to stand firm and not surrender your conservative principles." their hero, of course, is this man, known around town simply as grover. no, not the muppet, but chief enforcer of the notorious norquist pledge against taxes. republican candidates for office must sign or risk defeat by right-wing candidates in primaries where a turnout of die-hard partisans can decide the outcome. among republican politician
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 7:00pm PST
coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is an inappr
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 6:30pm PST
today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will hit its borrowing limit early next year, darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: sitting around the kitchen table with a middle class family in virginia, the president once again pressed for congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> if this family has a couple of thousand dollars less to spend, that translates into $200 billion of less consumer spending next year. and that's bad for businesses, large and small. >> reporter: behind the scenes, the two sides are talking again. but there was no progress in public. senators today fought over the debt limit, and ended up deadlocked over a bill to allow the president to automatically increase borrowing. >> he's shown what he is really after is unprecedented powers to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> reporter: if the debt limit isn'
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 12:00am PST
appeared to be that lawmakers will be back in washington right after christmas if there's to be any deal before the new year's deadline. and to two reporters who've been closely watching this story. todd zwillich covers congress for public radio international's "the takeaway" on wnyc. and carol lee of the "wall street journal" joins us from the white house. thank you both for talking to us. carol, i'm going to start with you. from the white house perspective, where do things stand? >> i think from the white house perspective, the ball is essentially in the house john boehner's court. i think the president and his team of advisors feel that they've positioned him fairly well, that he's in a very defense i believe position in terms of his latest offer, that he forward yesterday. to the speaker. but if you step back and think about where we were four days ago versus where we are now, it's pretty remarkable how much the two sides have come to very close to reaching an actual deal. now the two sides are in this position where the job is to sell it to their different caucuses and make sur
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 12:30pm PST
>>> from washington, the mclaughlin group, the american original. for over three decades, the gro brought to you in part by american petroleum institute. >>> on new years day, and during the first week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if yo
PBS
Dec 22, 2012 5:00am PST
is riding through the streets of washington in his carriage with secretary of state seward, his chief advisor and enforcer. and seward is apparently trying to convince him that this is not the time to push the amendment. >> we'll win the war, sir. it's inevitable isn't it? >> well, it ain't won yet. >> you'll begin your second term a semi-divine stature. imagine the possibilities peace will bring. why tarnish your invaluable luster with a battle in the house? it's a rat's nest in there, the same gang of talentless hicks and hacks who rejected the amendment ten months ago, we'll lose. >> i like our chances now. >> i like our chances now, lincoln's actual words or tony kushner's dramatic license? >> you know, i can't remember with that line. >> you don't know where you start and lincoln stops? >> there are a few places that i know are me and a few places that i know are him. i didn't write the second inaugural address, i wish i had. i can't remember that. it's definitely in the spirit. >> you say you chose to focus on this fight to pass the constitutional amendment in the house. it had
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 11:00pm PST
easily get what they wanted from state capitals than from washington, d.c. so they started putting their money in places like raleigh, north carolina, nashville, tennessee, phoenix, arizona, and madison, wisconsin. that's because what happens in our state legislatures directly affects our taxes, schools, roads, the quality of our air and water, even our right to vote. politicians and lobbyists at the core of this clever enterprise figured out how to pull it off in an organized, camouflaged way, covering their tracks while they put one over on an unsuspecting public. this is the story of how and why it worked. our report was many months in the making. it's a collaboration between tom casciato and kathleen hughes, the filmmakers at okapi productions, and the schumann media center that i head. schumann supports independent journalism and public watchdog groups like the center for media and democracy, whose investigators have been tracking the footprints of alec, an organization hiding in plain sight, yet one of the most influential and powerful in american politics. ♪ ♪ >> i've often to
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 6:30pm PST
you need is a whole bunch of people coming to washington saying do it exactly this way. do it exactly this way. we just need to fix the problem, and we need to do it in a way that is god fo --good for the economy and protects the most vulnerable in the society. >> does it matter if we have tax rates at 35% or 39%, or would it be more important to get this uncertainty out of the way? would that help the economy more? >> i think that's the exact point, that everybody, small businesses and big businesses are going to have different preferences for exactly how you fix the tax code, but the message they're delivering is a fix in and of itself that is real, and that would fix the problem, would be so beneficial for them. >> are we going to fix the problem? are we going ove over the cliff? >> this is coming down to the wire. i feel more pessimistic that i have before. the level of negotiating may in part be for show, but i'm terribly concerned that they're not at the point where they're really working to solve the problem for the good of the country and put the partisan differences aside. th
PBS
Dec 15, 2012 12:00am PST
washington state. it happened every part of the country. what more do people tonight as they go home and have dinner with their families and as they talk to their children, what more do we need to be doing? >> well, we can't turn our schools into fortresses. we can't turn movie theatres into fortresses or shopping malls into the fortresses. we've got to think about prevention as something that's done far earlier. when there are conflicts, when there are troubled individuals, when there are people who are extremely angry and up set and frustrated, as a society we've got to be more willing to reach out to those individuals, to-- we need to have mental health services available for those individuals who need it. we need counselling and mediation services available and domestic situations where there's intense conflict that hasn't resolved. but we've got to start before it escalates into a violent situation. and if we can provide these services more generally, we'll have a healthier society an we'll have fewer of those cases that rise to this extreme unusual level. >> and in those s
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 5:00am PST
to believe something they had seen on youtube from a washington redskins cheerleader than they would have believed something that they would have heard from the centers for disease control and prevention or the american academy of pediatrics. that's a little frightening. >> narrator: after jenny mccarthy saw desiree on youtube, generation rescue became involved in her treatment, connecting her with a controversial osteopath, dr. rashid buttar in north carolina. >> she flew out to see this doctor. he chelated her and did hyperbaric chamber treatments and many other type of biomedical therapies that we do with our kids, and she got better quick. after a few days of treating her, she was down to about seven seizures a day and speaking and walking. >> look at desiree now. >> narrator: upon finding her cured of a supposedly incurable condition, the media now presented her story as a hoax. >> we've been trying to reach you, and you have not been returning our phone calls. >> oh, i'm sorry. >> narrator: by now it had emerged that her admitting neurologist suspected desiree's condition was p
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 6:30pm PST
house will vote on the republican plan b t orrow. veterans of washington's budget battles wouldn't be orrprised to see a plan c or d before a final resolution is hammered out. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," d washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the autowa industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy autobiles. thatouldar is change dramatically. >> sue:e steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 6:30pm PST
washington tomorrow, cutting short his hawaiian holiday vacation. he will be meeting with congressional leaders for one last push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet called their members back to washington. and hopes for a deal by the december 31 deadline are fading. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the odds of avoiding the fiscal cliff did not get any better over the holiday. staff discussions continue, but there were few signs much, if anything has been accomplished. the house isn't even scheduled to return to washington yet, leaving it up to the senate to act. >> this is a senate that is incredibly divided, hopelessly partisan, requires 60 votes to do anything and somehow, we are going to be relying on them to in five days, come up with a compromise which is acceptable where a compromise wasn't acceptable in four years. >> reporter: it now looks like some kind of fall over the cliff is the likeliest scenario. and depending on how long it lasts, it could
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 6:30pm PST
.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't
PBS
Dec 22, 2012 12:00am PST
the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republicans remain willing to
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am PST
tonight, kwame holman has the latest on washington's impasse on taxes and spending. >> ifill: then we examine nato's decision to send patriot anti- missile systems to turkey, as fears grow that syrian chemical weapons could cross the border. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown talks to mcclatchy newspapers' egypt correspondent nancy youssef about the massive antigovernment protests in cairo today. >> ifill: we continue our series of conversations about the fiscal cliff. tonight we hear from economist paul krugman. >> i don't think there's going to be much of a deal. i think there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome. >> woodruff: from haiti, fred de sam lazaro reports on the efforts to stem a deadly cholera epidemic that began after the 2010 earthquake. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to author and journalist tom ricks about what he describes as the decline of american military leadership. >> today nobody gets credit for anything and mediocrity is accepted as a core value in the performance of generals. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs n
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 6:30pm PST
. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: well, roger altman is confident democrats and republicans will strike a deal and avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. he was deputy treasury secretary in the clinton administration and is now executive chairman and founder of evercore partners. >> susie: roger, so great to have you back on "nightly business report." >> thank you, susie. >> susie: nice to see you. why are you so optmistic there is going to be a fiscal cliff deal? >> i would cite two broad reasons, and then a few reasons specific to the negotiations. first on the broadside, the financial markets, as we've all seen over the past seven to nine days, especially the equity markets, have been rallying strongly in anticipation of an agreement. they're looking right past the fiscal cliff towards improved economic growth in 2013 and 2014. of course, they can be wrong, but on something of this magnitude, they rarely are wrong. second, i think the cost of failure, for both sides, the president and the democrats, and, of course, the republicans, especially in the house, is too
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 12:00am PST
latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs sta
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 12:00am PST
conservative washington think tank. in a statement, demint said, a tea party favorite, demint had blasted the house republicans' proposal to raise r earlier in the week. south carolina's other senator lindsey graham lamented the loss of his colleague and friend. >> he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his position and did it very effectively, jim made the republican party quite frankly look inward and do some self evaluation, conservatism is an asset not a liability. >> woodruff: the other side of capitol hill was largely quiet today, with the house not in session, and most members gone home for the weekend's recess. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": egypt's political turmoil; trims to social programs to solve the fiscal crisis; sea level rise in a virginia city; diplomatic movement on syria and a path to high school graduation. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the death toll from a typhoon in the southern philippines climbed to more than 370 today. nearly 400 others are still missing since the storm hit tuesda
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 12:00am PST
vacation to head back to washington, while harry reid says the country is headed toward the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on efforts to avert the looming deadline from todd zwillich of public radio international. >> brown: then, geo-politics and children: russia moves to end adoptions by american parents. >> warner: what austerity measures look like at street level: we have a report from athens. >> by the end of 2013 greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 12:00am PST
losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading w
PBS
Dec 13, 2012 6:30pm PST
service and airports. darren gersh, nbr, washington >> susie: that stalemate over the fiscal cliff weighed on the markets today, despite some encouraging reports on the economy. investors shrugged off news that initial jobless claims fell more than expected during the latest week, retail sales bounced back in november, and wholesale prices declined last month. by the close, the dow tumbled 75 points, the nasdaq fell 22 and the s&p was off nine points. despite that pessimism, many investment managers and analysts are feeling optimistic about 2013. a new investor survey says the u.s. stock market will be the best performing stock market in the world. for details, john rogers joins us. he's c.e.o. of the cfa institute that conducted the survey. so john, the u.s. stock market ranked as the best performer. if we look at the charge of coming in in second place, china and brazil. why the vote of confidence considering all these concerns about the fiscal cliff? >> you're right, susie. it's interesting. it's a happy holiday season for investors. in the u.s. the stock market is going to have
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 12:00am PST
schools, here in washington the debate is returning to the always thorny issue of gun control. members of congress are starting to be heard on gun law, heeding the president's call to act to prevent another atrocity. as he had on friday, the president pressed for change last night regardless he said of the politics. >> in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. >> suarez: today at the capitol, there were early signs of a possible break in the long dead lock on gun control. on ms-nbc west virginia senator joe said newtown has changed the conversation. >> i ask all my friends in the n.r.a. -- and i'm a proud n.r.a. member and always have been -- that we need to sit down and move this dialogue a sensible, reasonable approach to fixing it. it's part of it, not all of it. everything has to be on the table and i think it will be >> suarez: this afternoon the senate opened with a moment of silence for t
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 6:30pm PST
uncertainty over washington, this kind of deal isn't going to fix any of that for them. and hope for a done deal by the holiday is fading fast. senate majority leader harry reid said today he expects the senate will be back to work the day after christmas. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: optimism that speaker boehner's latest offer could get the fiscal cliff talks moving again, helped stocks move nicely higher: the dow rose 100 points, the nasdaq added 39, the s&p up almost 17 points. but with time running out to reach a deal, what happens on wall street, if we go over the cliff? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: one thing is for sure, wall street can count. that means investors know there are just nine trading days left until tax hikes automatically take effect across the nation, and hit americans where it hurts: their wallets. and, investors are also aware there are even fewer days before lawmakers are scheduled to leave on holiday break. despite the ticking clock, many investors remain optimistic there will be a deal between congress and the white house before the ball
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 6:30pm PST
. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: many companies aren't waiting on washington to reach an agreement on taxes and spending. they're taking action now to pay shareholders, by declaring special dividends. today, whole foods became the latest in a slew of firms opting for one-time payouts. suzanne pratt reports on what's behind these investor pay-days. >> reporter: costco is doing it. brown forman-- the maker of jack daniels and finlandia is also doing it. today, even whole foods is finding it appetizing. they've all announced special dividends, eager to reward their shareholders with a nice check before expected tax increases happen next year. >> current law says that qualified dividend income tax rates are at 15%. and, if no legislation is passed between now and then end of the year, those rates would go up to as high as 43.4%. >> companies just want to pass along these dividends. it's a thank you to shareholders. it sparks interest in their stock. >> reporter: according to s&p, this month alone 216 companies have declared special dividends. last november only 72 firms decid
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 12:00am PST
outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking with the top house republican, and as a year-end deadline moved even closer. the president took his public campaign for a deficit deal on his terms to the daimler diesel plant in redford michigan. >> if congress doesn't act soon meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1, everybody is going to see their income taxes go up. it's true. y'all don't like that? >> no! woodruff: instead, mr. obama again pressed for raising tax rates on the top two percent of incomes. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans. >> woodruff: his michigan visit came a day after the president and house speaker john boehner met privately at the white house. their first one-on-one session since the election. neither side gave any details about what was discussed. instead they issued identi
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 12:00am PST
again today in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james brady-- the press secretary critically wounded in the shooting of president reagan in 1981-- to talk about gun violence. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> ifill: instead, in the wake of the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, mr. oba said, "this time, the words need to lead to action" on gun violence. >> the vast majority of responsible law abiding gun owners would be some of the first to say that we should be able to keep an irresponsible law breaking few from buying a weapon of war. i'm willing to bet that they don't think that usina gun and using common sense are incompatible ideas. there is a big chunk of spaceus between what the 2nd amendment means and having no rules at all. >> reporter: to that end, the president announced vice president biden and an administration team will craft recommendations on everything from gun laws to mental health, to be sent to congress by january. >> this is
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 6:30pm PST
namesake metals. we'll explain. more tough talk today from washington on the fiscal cliff: treasury secretary timothy geithner said he's willing to go over it if republicans don't agree to tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. president obama said basically the same thing but added one more hard line to the negotiations. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to a debt ceiling vote and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation-- which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year-- i will not play that game. >> late today the president spoke by telephone with house speaker john boehner. no specifics on what they said to each other, but it was their first conversation in a week. eventually the two sides will get down to bargaining over specifics, including entitlements. one idea may be to change the way the government measures inflation. that may sound like a small change, but, as darren gersh reports, it could have a big impact. >> reporter: if the price of oranges goes up, consumers wi
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 6:30pm PST
report. washington bureau chief, dadarren gersh. >> thank you. >> tom: so, with no major economic data today, stock markets were focused on the federal reserve the entire session. the major indices jumped midday after the central banks announcement it would continue supporting the economy, but those gains didn't last long. the dow fell three points, the nasdaq dropped 8.5, the s&p 500 closed essentially unchanged. >> susie: for more analysis on that unprecedented fed decision, we turn now to mohamed el-erian, c.e.o. of pimco. >> susie: mohammed, great to see you. so you've had time to think about what the fed said. what is your take on this unprecedented move? is this a good thing? is this a bad thing for the economy and for the outlook going forward? >> my take is basically what is showing in the market today, which is to combine the words "unprecedented" "surprising" with unchanged markets. how do you do that? the analogy, susie, is look at the patient who is taking an experimental drug, that hasn't been clinically tested. professional investors like the idea that the fed is all
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 6:30pm PST
in washington today, stocks on wall street were stuck in neutral. the dow rose 15 points, the nasdaq gained nine, and s&p added a fraction. still, the benchmark s&p 500 index has regained most of the ground it lost after the presidential election. that's as investors may sense an agreement to avert the fiscal cliff is coming soon. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: the tree is up on wall and broad, and so is the u.s. stock market. the holiday season typically is a good time for stocks. in fact, since 1950, december has been the best month of the year for the s&p 500 with the index gaining an average of 1.7%. this december is off to a good start, even though the fiscal cliff looms large over trading floors. most investors remain optimistic there will be a deal in washington before santa arrives. but floor broker teddy weisberg isn't sure where all the optimism is coming from. >> it's a real dilemma here because a lot of folks that i talk to, and customers and professionals alike, are very, very nervous. and i think they are perplexed by the lack of weakness in the market, if you will
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 12:00am PST
distraction for many american pedestrians. that was the finding of a university of washington study published in the journal "prevention." it tracked 1,100 pedestrians in seattle, washington and found more than a third of people text, talk or listen to music when they cross the street. only one in four people followed the proper safety protocol, looking both ways and obeying the light. vehicle-pedestrian accidents kill 4,000 people every year in the u.s. and injure 60,000 others. the man who co-invented the bar code joseph woodland has died in new jersey. woodland's bar codes are on nearly every product in stores today. he came up with the idea after drawing morse code dots and dashes in the sand on a miami beach, absent-mindedly letting his fingers drag a series of parallel lines instead. the idea was patented in 1952 but not put into wide use until the 1970s. woodland was 91 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: 18 days and counting until the end of the year when the government reaches the edge of the so-called fiscal cliff. congre
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am PST
condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposition activists vowed to hold their ground against the newly approved constitution. >> what we all need as constitution is express the demands of all egyptians. we are here to say that we need constitution for all of us. >> ifill: sunday leaders of the national salvation front warned the document would give too much way to islamic law and curb the rights of women and the christian minority. >> we are committed to continuing our collective peaceful struggle in order to bring down this constitution through legitimate means as soon as p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)